1/14
★★★★
2017 WINNIPEG FRINGE THEATRE FESTIVAL
The Winnipeg Free Press
"It's a bit like if the detention in The Breakfast Club just kept going until it curdled into the hell-is-other-people existential nightmare of Jean-Paul Sartre's No Exit. Friendship can be dangerous when the line between intimacy and inspiration becomes blurred." (Winnipeg Free Press)
 
SYNOPSIS
Four lifelong friends reconvene in an attempt to finish a short film. When an intimate tape is released and exposed, the four creatives are forced to confront longstanding tensions and creative and personal differences.

 
DEVELOPMENT HISTORY
The Stock
is the debut production of Winnipeg's ArtLaunch Theatre Company, an ad-hoc collective mandated to produce plays and performance pieces that challenge human agency in the digital age. The play was inspired by, and conceived out of, conversations in the public sphere surrounding #MeToo and sexual assault in the aftermath of the Jian Ghomeshi allegations.

PRODUCTIONS
The Stock premiered at Manitoba Theatre for Young People's Richardson Hall 
on July 19th, 2017,, running until July 30th as a part of the 2017 Winnipeg Fringe Theatre Festival. The production was co-created by Raffie Rosenberg and Camille Intson, written by Intson and directed by Rosenberg with stage management by Katie Schmidt and lighting by Tori Popp. The original cast featured Steve Morrow, Jillian Willems, Wes Rambo, and Elena Howard-Scott.
★★★★
Steve Morrow, Jillian Willems, Wes Rambo, and Elena Howard-Scott are uniformly excellent, each one mining truth in a tight script by Camille Intson. There is enough wordplay, irony, and allusion here to reward multiple viewings."
Crisply directed at a nimble pace by Raffie Rosenberg, not a moment is wasted, not a motion unnecessary. Even the multiple cameras, laptops, and screens are integral to the story as well as to the staging of it."​​
- Ben Wiebe, The Winnipeg Free Press
"THE STOCK, a short but powerful dramedy, is about four life-long friends who have each attempted to forge a creative path in the arts and the tensions that can arise from that.
 
It's a bit like if the detention in The Breakfast Club just kept going until it curdled into the hell-is-other-people existential nightmare of Jean-Paul Sartre's No Exit. Friendship can be dangerous when the line between intimacy and inspiration becomes blurred.​"
- The Winnipeg Free Press
(L to R) Allison Shea Reed and Simon Bennett. Costumes and design by Lorna Craig. Photo by Bruce Peters.
(L to R) Wes Rambo, Jillian Willems, Steve Rambo. Photo by Camille Intson.
All photos by Camille Intson.
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© Camille Intson 2020